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Your supervisor knows best. Maybe delve into synthetic biology usage for detecting bacteria? Look up iGEM - international genetically engineered machine. It's a collegiate competition that employs students to come up with ingenious ways to tackle humanity's biggest problems. A lot of the projects end up using synthetic biology and electronics to detect certain diseases. Recently, I helped develop a machine that worked with salmonella. It used restrictive digest to cut out a gene in the salmonella so it would uptake a gene that we wanted it to - a gene that would make it produce a red fluorescent protein (RFP). Excuse my simple terminology, I don't want to be confusing. A sensor would pick up the red fluorescence and flag the sample. This is all stuff you can do with some funding and high school biology lab-grade equipment. 

 

Maybe run your own experiment about the use of organic antibacterials like citrus, ginger, and honey on like E. coli k-12. This is EXTREMELY simple, and you could definitely talk about the efficacy and safety aspect when comparing to non-organic cleansers like Lysol, Clorox, etc., which can be toxic but often more effective. 

 

Good luck. Hope this helps. 

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5 hours ago, AngryEngie said:

Your supervisor knows best. Maybe delve into synthetic biology usage for detecting bacteria? Look up iGEM - international genetically engineered machine. It's a collegiate competition that employs students to come up with ingenious ways to tackle humanity's biggest problems. A lot of the projects end up using synthetic biology and electronics to detect certain diseases. Recently, I helped develop a machine that worked with salmonella. It used restrictive digest to cut out a gene in the salmonella so it would uptake a gene that we wanted it to - a gene that would make it produce a red fluorescent protein (RFP). Excuse my simple terminology, I don't want to be confusing. A sensor would pick up the red fluorescence and flag the sample. This is all stuff you can do with some funding and high school biology lab-grade equipment. 

 

Maybe run your own experiment about the use of organic antibacterials like citrus, ginger, and honey on like E. coli k-12. This is EXTREMELY simple, and you could definitely talk about the efficacy and safety aspect when comparing to non-organic cleansers like Lysol, Clorox, etc., which can be toxic but often more effective. 

 

Good luck. Hope this helps. 

Thank you so much! You’re first idea actually seems quite interesting but unfortunately I doubt my school has sufficient resources for it

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